#whomademyclothes?

“On 24 April every year, Fashion Revolution Day brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes. We want fashion to become a force for good. We believe in an industry that values people, the environment, creativity and profit in equal measure. We believe transparency is the first step to transform the industry. And it starts with one simple question: Who made my clothes?

Source: Fashion Revolution

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part II)

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part II)

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(Fashion Revolution Week has finally arrived, and to celebrate it we have interviewed Carry Sommers, co-founder of the movement Fashion Revolution together with Orsola de Castro. The interview starts in the previous blog post. ) 

On 24 April we will be celebrating a new edition of the Fashion Revolution Day and, in order to achieve a higher level of transparency within the fashion industry, you are encouraging consumers all around the world to address the question of “who made my clothes?” to different fashion labels of their choice. Why this concreate question and no other?
We no longer know who makes our clothes and we don’t know the true cost of the things we buy. The fashion supply chain is fractured and the producers have become faceless. This is costing lives. We believe that rebuilding the broken links across the whole supply chain, from farmer to consumer, is the only way to transform the entire industry. Fashion Revolution brings everyone together to make that happen. Read more

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part I)

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part I)

Carry Sommers
Carry Somers is a British designer and social entrepreneur. / Provided by: Fashion Revolution

Fashion Revolution Week has finally arrived, and to celebrate it we have interviewed designer Carry Somers, who co-founded the movement Fashion Revolution together with Orsola de Castro. This global initiative was born when, on 24 April 2013, 1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 were injured when the Rana Plaza building collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Most of these people were garment workers.

When did you realise there was an urgent need for a change to start taking place within the fashion industry?
Sadly, Rana Plaza was inevitable. There are ever longer supply chains, and a resulting shift in responsibility. However, this was a tragedy that could have taken place in any fast fashion producing country. Rana Plaza happens to be in Bangladesh. What happened reflects a global trend of increased ‘demand’ which feeds the fast fashion supply chain. There have been many improvements in the fashion supply chain since the dust has settled on the Rana Plaza disaster, although it is unfortunate that it has taken a tragedy of this scale to start to bring about change. Read more

“Local Goods Market” – an absolute must go in Amsterdam

“Local Goods Market” – an absolute must go in Amsterdam

The CROWDY HOUSE is an online platform and marketplace for designers.

Food, clothing, books… and a lot of surprising designs! That is what you will find at the Local Goods weekend market in Amsterdam. Every two weeks, the passage of de Hallen throbs with life thanks to the original work of the many local artists and brands who sell their multi-coloured creations to the visitors. From handmade decoration items to modern 3D-printing techniques in the fabrication process of jewellery, the pleasant walk through the venue is a constant delight.

The spirit behind this beautiful initiative, started by the platform Packhuis de Zwijger, is well-explained in the following paragraph taken from their brochure:

“In these times where there are so many flagship stores and the world is dominated by mass production, the Local Goods Store (founded following the success of the Local Good Market) gives a new voice to young entrepreneurs. The products are made by local, independent makers, who want to share their story with you.”

Some of the brands presenting their creations on the first weekend of March in this inviting atmosphere were:

  • Studio Hamerhaai. One of our favourites due to their amazing robot-shaped lamps and mini-wardrobes made out of wood that had previously protected paintings during a museum renovation.
  • Winter in Holland. Focusses on creating exceptional fabrics, both handmade and -dyed.
  • Benjamin Spoth. We loved his incredible upcycled lamps made from leftover wood.
  • Atelier Am. Founded by Amber Rep, a young local artisan who produces porcelain products.

Read more