#whomademyclothes?

“On 24 April every year, Fashion Revolution Day brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes. We want fashion to become a force for good. We believe in an industry that values people, the environment, creativity and profit in equal measure. We believe transparency is the first step to transform the industry. And it starts with one simple question: Who made my clothes?

Source: Fashion Revolution

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part I)

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part I)

Carry Sommers
Carry Somers is a British designer and social entrepreneur. / Provided by: Fashion Revolution

Fashion Revolution Week has finally arrived, and to celebrate it we have interviewed designer Carry Somers, who co-founded the movement Fashion Revolution together with Orsola de Castro. This global initiative was born when, on 24 April 2013, 1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 were injured when the Rana Plaza building collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Most of these people were garment workers.

When did you realise there was an urgent need for a change to start taking place within the fashion industry?
Sadly, Rana Plaza was inevitable. There are ever longer supply chains, and a resulting shift in responsibility. However, this was a tragedy that could have taken place in any fast fashion producing country. Rana Plaza happens to be in Bangladesh. What happened reflects a global trend of increased ‘demand’ which feeds the fast fashion supply chain. There have been many improvements in the fashion supply chain since the dust has settled on the Rana Plaza disaster, although it is unfortunate that it has taken a tragedy of this scale to start to bring about change. Read more

A shop full of stories // Una tienda llena de historias

A shop full of stories // Una tienda llena de historias

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Vintage Fabrik is Tabitha Gopp’s first shop; a longtime dream of hers that came true last year in March 2014. The store combines original antique furniture from the 1920s’ to the 1970s’ with handmade pieces of jewellery, rich and varied decoration items made out of recycled materials, tons of postcards…and even fair trade chocolate! Once you go inside there is no possible rest. The space is so packed with all kinds of curious objects that your eyes jump from one to another without even giving you the time to process the information.

Located in Nordstraße, one of Düsseldorfs most lively streets, the concept underneath the shop is to offer unique decoration pieces, coming from different corners of Europe, that can be found nowhere else in the city. In this sense, when it comes to getting the furniture in good conditions to be sold again, their modus operandi includes also minor restoration works. In the small studio of the shop, Tabitha and her assistant take care of the delicate cleaning process and pay attention to other details – like the surfaces – so that the items can be fully usable. A task not always easy to complete due to the fact that some of these furnitures were used in fabrics that haven’t existed anymore since decades. Read more

Patterns that make us feel

We created this photo story in collaboration with the Italian ecological silkscreen by  Tundra Stamperia. The products they commercialise have been handmade; in addition, they always make sure to work with organic or recycled materials as well as cloths manufactured according to fair trade standars.

Apart from their own designs (an indredibly soft t-shirt with a geometric pattern made out of bamboo, a pink body for babies with a whale-pattern and a really fun notebook), our friends from Tundra also sent us a colourful combination consisting of a bracelet and earrings that has been handcrafted in Ghana. These accessories are sold for charitable purposes by Ancora of Hope Organization (ANCHOR), a local NGO that is trying to fund a school centre in the African country.

If you didn’t have a chance yet to read the article we wrote about Tundra, click on the following link and find out all the details about the ecological approach and ethical values of the brand:

· The magic colours of the Tundra.

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Hemos elaborado este reportaje en colaboración con la serigrafía ecológica italiana Tundra Stamperia. Los productos que comercializa esta marca están hechos a mano; además, siempre trabajan con materiales orgánicos o reciclados, y prendas de ropa confeccionadas de acuerdo a los estándares internacionales de comercio justo.

Por otra parte, junto a sus propios diseños (una camiseta de estampado geométrico hecha a partir de bambú, un body rosa para bebés con el dibujo de una ballena y un divertido cuaderno), nuestros amigos de Tundra también nos han mandado un colorido conjunto de pendientes y pulsera hecho artesanalmente en Ghana. Estos accesorios son vendidos con fines solidarios por Ancora of Hope Organization (ANCHOR), una ONG local que está intentando financiar un centro escolar en el país africano.

Si todavía no has tenido oportunidad de leer nuestro artículo sobre Tundra, pincha en el siguiente link y descubre en qué consiste el planteamiento ecológico de la marca y sus valores éticos:

· Los colores mágicos de la Tundra.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY/FOTOFRAFÍAS POR: ROSSANA Photography