#whomademyclothes?

“On 24 April every year, Fashion Revolution Day brings people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes. We want fashion to become a force for good. We believe in an industry that values people, the environment, creativity and profit in equal measure. We believe transparency is the first step to transform the industry. And it starts with one simple question: Who made my clothes?

Source: Fashion Revolution

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part II)

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part II)

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(Fashion Revolution Week has finally arrived, and to celebrate it we have interviewed Carry Sommers, co-founder of the movement Fashion Revolution together with Orsola de Castro. The interview starts in the previous blog post. ) 

On 24 April we will be celebrating a new edition of the Fashion Revolution Day and, in order to achieve a higher level of transparency within the fashion industry, you are encouraging consumers all around the world to address the question of “who made my clothes?” to different fashion labels of their choice. Why this concreate question and no other?
We no longer know who makes our clothes and we don’t know the true cost of the things we buy. The fashion supply chain is fractured and the producers have become faceless. This is costing lives. We believe that rebuilding the broken links across the whole supply chain, from farmer to consumer, is the only way to transform the entire industry. Fashion Revolution brings everyone together to make that happen. Read more

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part I)

Meet fashion activist Carry Somers! (Part I)

Carry Sommers
Carry Somers is a British designer and social entrepreneur. / Provided by: Fashion Revolution

Fashion Revolution Week has finally arrived, and to celebrate it we have interviewed designer Carry Somers, who co-founded the movement Fashion Revolution together with Orsola de Castro. This global initiative was born when, on 24 April 2013, 1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 were injured when the Rana Plaza building collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Most of these people were garment workers.

When did you realise there was an urgent need for a change to start taking place within the fashion industry?
Sadly, Rana Plaza was inevitable. There are ever longer supply chains, and a resulting shift in responsibility. However, this was a tragedy that could have taken place in any fast fashion producing country. Rana Plaza happens to be in Bangladesh. What happened reflects a global trend of increased ‘demand’ which feeds the fast fashion supply chain. There have been many improvements in the fashion supply chain since the dust has settled on the Rana Plaza disaster, although it is unfortunate that it has taken a tragedy of this scale to start to bring about change. Read more

Angels of Dignity (II)

Detail of the interior of the store. // PHOTO: Rossana Photography

“The love we give away is the only one we keep” is one of the inspiring messages we found printed on fabric cards at the Dignita Store in Amsterdam. Like we mentioned in our previous post of this series, this shop is a social enterprise that sells products made by survivors of human trafficking to finance – among others – culinary training programs for them. That way, the victims have a chance to look at the future with hope thanks to the new professional opportunities they now aspire to.

The entity behind the Dignita Store is the Dutch arm of Not for Sale, an international organization that defines its goals as follows:

“To break the cycle of exploitation, Not For Sale provides survivors and at-risk communities with shelter, healthcare, and legal services, first attending to the most basic needs of individuals who have suffered extreme trauma. We are dedicated to addressing the profound and enduring effects of violence and exploitation. Only once their physical and emotional well-being is established can we begin to work together toward long-term opportunities for education and employment.”

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